I have one aunt who always brings Pitsi-Pitsi to family gatherings. Pitsi-pitsi is a traditional Filipino dessert made simply with cassava (yucca), sugar, and water. Like many Filipino desserts, it is steamed. Other characteristics it shares with other Filipino desserts include: sticky, mildly sweet, aesthetically simple, topped with grated coconut.
Pitsi-pitsi tastes best when eaten the same day it is prepared. It can be refridgerated, but loses its soft texture. The flavor is hard to describe, except that it is mild and delicate. The best description I can come up with is “smooth and nutty.” Though there is no oil in the recipe, pitsi-pitsi has an oily texture that must come from the cassava itself.
I followed this recipe-1 cup grated cassava, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups water - cook 10 minutes on stove, then steam 10 minutes.
I spread the mixture into a round cake pan lined with wax paper. I then floated the cake pan in a large partially covered saucepan with boiling water as a makeshift steamer.
I had never used cassava before. Wegman’s sells it, and it comes with a waxy coating. The flesh is surprisingly wet and the water must be squeezed out before cooking.

I have one aunt who always brings Pitsi-Pitsi to family gatherings. Pitsi-pitsi is a traditional Filipino dessert made simply with cassava (yucca), sugar, and water. Like many Filipino desserts, it is steamed. Other characteristics it shares with other Filipino desserts include: sticky, mildly sweet, aesthetically simple, topped with grated coconut.

Pitsi-pitsi tastes best when eaten the same day it is prepared. It can be refridgerated, but loses its soft texture. The flavor is hard to describe, except that it is mild and delicate. The best description I can come up with is “smooth and nutty.” Though there is no oil in the recipe, pitsi-pitsi has an oily texture that must come from the cassava itself.

I followed this recipe-1 cup grated cassava, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups water - cook 10 minutes on stove, then steam 10 minutes.

I spread the mixture into a round cake pan lined with wax paper. I then floated the cake pan in a large partially covered saucepan with boiling water as a makeshift steamer.

I had never used cassava before. Wegman’s sells it, and it comes with a waxy coating. The flesh is surprisingly wet and the water must be squeezed out before cooking.

I have one aunt who always brings Pitsi-Pitsi to family gatherings. Pitsi-pitsi is a traditional Filipino dessert made simply with cassava (yucca), sugar, and water. Like many Filipino desserts, it is steamed. Other characteristics it shares with other Filipino desserts include: sticky, mildly sweet, aesthetically simple, topped with grated coconut.
Pitsi-pitsi tastes best when eaten the same day it is prepared. It can be refridgerated, but loses its soft texture. The flavor is hard to describe, except that it is mild and delicate. The best description I can come up with is “smooth and nutty.” Though there is no oil in the recipe, pitsi-pitsi has an oily texture that must come from the cassava itself.
I followed this recipe-1 cup grated cassava, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups water - cook 10 minutes on stove, then steam 10 minutes.
I spread the mixture into a round cake pan lined with wax paper. I then floated the cake pan in a large partially covered saucepan with boiling water as a makeshift steamer.
I had never used cassava before. Wegman’s sells it, and it comes with a waxy coating. The flesh is surprisingly wet and the water must be squeezed out before cooking.

I have one aunt who always brings Pitsi-Pitsi to family gatherings. Pitsi-pitsi is a traditional Filipino dessert made simply with cassava (yucca), sugar, and water. Like many Filipino desserts, it is steamed. Other characteristics it shares with other Filipino desserts include: sticky, mildly sweet, aesthetically simple, topped with grated coconut.

Pitsi-pitsi tastes best when eaten the same day it is prepared. It can be refridgerated, but loses its soft texture. The flavor is hard to describe, except that it is mild and delicate. The best description I can come up with is “smooth and nutty.” Though there is no oil in the recipe, pitsi-pitsi has an oily texture that must come from the cassava itself.

I followed this recipe-1 cup grated cassava, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups water - cook 10 minutes on stove, then steam 10 minutes.

I spread the mixture into a round cake pan lined with wax paper. I then floated the cake pan in a large partially covered saucepan with boiling water as a makeshift steamer.

I had never used cassava before. Wegman’s sells it, and it comes with a waxy coating. The flesh is surprisingly wet and the water must be squeezed out before cooking.

Posted 4 years ago & Filed under Filipino, dessert, cassava, coconut, View high resolution

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Things I love: cooking, baking, working with my hands, the great outdoors, sunny breezy days, bodies of water, traveling, running, tea, coffee, chai lattes, things that are colorful and/or shiny, babies, and dogs.

- Christine

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